Sit Down/Stand Up

OK, I know I’ve been terrible about putting stuff on my website. To be honest I’ve had an awful year so far with technology. My computer died on me, thanks to a Windows 10 update that killed my Windows 7 operating system. I was also still recovering from my broken leg, a saga I will regale you with another time, and to be honest not much was happening I wanted to tell the world about. However, I’m now out of my plaster and life is fun again. There’s loads to catch up on too, so keep you eyes out for more posts soon.

Mik on stage doing his stand up routine, with a BSL signer next to himIn March I found myself in a packed comedy club in East London, about to do my first attempt at stand up. I’d been asked by the BBC to take part in an event called Storytelling Live, that was being put on by BBC Ouch. I was one of seven disabled people, some comedians and some not, who were going to tell their story about love or relationships. I chose to tell the story of how i came to terms with my sexual dysfunction, but in a way that would put the audience at ease. And it worked, phew! The room laughed all the way through my set, despite it being a rather personal one, and I left the stage buzzing, sure I would do more comedy.

Mik backstage being made up, by a blonde makr up artist.

The event was being filmed by the BBC and soon an edited version of my set went live on the BBC News On-line website. Within the first 24 hours of going live, it had been watched by over 1.5 million people, and was number 6 in the most watched on-line videos for the BBC. So now everyone knows about my willy! Since then I’ve been asked to help on a project that aims to advise GP’s and medical professionals how to help people who have lost the ability to work like they should in the bedroom department, which is amazing. I am very lucky, as I am totally happy with the way my body works and have an amazing sex life, but I know most people who loose the ability to sex like they teach you in text books think that’s the end of their sex life. So to do something to change that, however small, is amazing.

Anyway, without further rambling, the article I wrote for the BBC and the video clip of my stand up routine can be found here. As soon as it goes live on Youtube I’ll put the link up.

A cartoon of Mik talking to a woman standing next to him

Before I go, this is the cartoon of me from the BBC art department. Cool huh?

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What’s the weather like Mik?

Is the BBC ready for Mik?

Is the BBC ready for Mik?

I must admit I haven’t been updating my website as much as I should have recently. I’ve been really really busy, but I had to tell you all some amazing news. On Wednesday July 29th I am starting on a three day course at the BBC, training to be a weather presenter. The course got loads of publicity as it was especially looking for disabled people to take part, and the right wing press went a bit ape over this as they said it was positive discrimination. Well, yes it is and I think it’s about time. Disabled people are still pretty invisible from our TV screens, unless they are talking about being disabled, and this is course is part of drive from the BBC to change that. All I say is bravo Auntie Beeb. Now I’m not sure I will end up with a job at the end, as I don’t exactly look like an stereotypical weather presenter, but the new skills will be fantastic.

Presenting the weather is a real skill, and one that if you do it right makes it look much easier than it really is. You have to get across loads of information in a fun and entertaining way, in a really short space of time and all live.Doing my audition was scary but by Friday I will have the skills to be a weather presenter. So watch this apce for news. Fingers crossed eh?

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Memories of Representation!

On Friday August 22nd I took part in the monthly BBC Ouch Podcast, with presenters Simon Minty and Shannon Murray. It was great to be back at the BBC, to be in a studio covering stories about disability and to be working with such great people. However the whole experience did leave me a little saddened.

Mik outside New Broadcasting House

Outside the Beeb

I was filled with the memories of a time when disabled people were featured on radio and TV so much more often. It might sound crazy to any body who is young reading this, but when I started in the media over 25 years ago disabled people appeared regularly on both TV and radio. All of the TV channels had a regular show dedicated to disability, fronted and made by disabled people and in radio we not only had a dedicated show but disabled people worked in the mainstream all over the air waves. I myself started out in mainstream TV, working on prime time on ITV, before going over to Channel 4’s “yoof” output. I was also picked up the the BBC’s disability show One In Four which was reaching the end of a highly successful run, featuring a team of disabled presenters that were minor household names. When the show ended, the BBC created the Disability Programs Unit, which ensured that all disability based TV was made by entirely disabled production staff as well as being fronted by disabled onscreen talent. They made the series From The Edge, which ran for 10 years, and Over The Edge as well as other award winning shows such as Disabled Century. All made by a team of talented disabled people. The other channels also had specialist disability programs too, but the BBC was most committed to ensuring a visible disabled presence within their output.

In The Studio

In The Studio

What is most important about having shows about disabled people being made by disabled people was the representation was fair and truthful. We made sure no one was exploited and that we always covered a story in such a way to empower those involved. Sadly the landscape of the industry changed as the century came to a close and by the year 2000 all disability TV had been canceled. At the BBC all of the onscreen talent were told we would be “integrated” into the mainstream, but what actually happened was we pretty much all ended up on the dole. After that disabled people disappeared from our screens, and so we ended where we are today. With the exception of The Last Leg and ParaSport I would say disabled people are either invisible or the object of “freak TV”. We now hear that the industry wants to increase the numbers of disabled talent on our screens, but will these moves get anywhere near to the level we once had? I doubt it. Even if they slowly do, will this talent have the ability to control what they are expected to do and be involved in shaping the output as not to create exploitative or unrepresentative programs? I hope so, but I would say that if the programming that has been produced in the last ten years is anything to go by my hope may be misplaced.

Recording in the Bag!

Recording in the Bag!

While it is great that disabled people still have somewhere to go to find out about news that impacts on them, thanks to the podcasts of the BBC, Disability Now and Disability Horizons, it is a real shame that these are the only resources. Especially in a media that has now proliferated and grown in a way we could never have imagined way back when. If there had been a real integration of both the disabled talent and the stories that are of interest to the disabled community then I doubt we would be needing yet another big push to increase disabled people in the media. Instead of creating a representative media back in the late 1990s, we were written out of the industry, with only few people like those at BBC Ouch and the ubiquitous BBC Radio 4 presenter Peter White remaining. So we end up where we are today, with the industry acting like they are doing great things by trying to increase the numbers of disabled people in the media, while not admitting that they are only trying to correct mistakes made decades ago. Disabled people can be great on our screens and working behind the action, and anyone of my age will know this to be true. I mean, without blowing my own trumpet, I won an Emmy in 1992 and was voted Children’s TV Presenter of the Year in the same year. Not disabled presenter, just presenter! To think that back then there were so many disabled faces on our screens your needed both hands to count them! We must get back to those days and keep it that way.

Will Disabled Talent Always Be On The Outside?

Will Disabled Talent Always Be On The Outside?

Right, rant over. One last thing…. of you are a media exec looking for disabled talent…. gizza a job! (Shameful I know…. but if you don’t ask, you don’t get!)

The Podcast is available from the BBC Ouch website now!

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Shrink Wrap this weekend on BBC3CR

The face for radio?

A face for radio?

This Sunday I am appearing on the BBC 3 Counties radio show Shrink Wrap, chatting about my experiences of education. The show is all about Inclusive Education and SEN provision, so I went off to Putteridge High School, my old high, to chat with the students and staff about what it is like to go to a mainstream school if you have an impairment. I was the first disabled kid to attend Putteridge and I know how much it set me up to be the man I am today. The biggest thing I gained from my time at school is the knowledge that just because I have an impairment doesn’t mean I am any less than anyone else, just different. One thing’s for sure… I like being different!

Mikat BBC3CR with Chetna and Toby

In The Studio – Mik at BBC3CR with Chetna and Toby

It is a rather serious subject, and as I sat in the studio listening to Chetna Kang and Toby Friedner, the programs regular hosts, chat with experts about SEN provision and the forthcoming changes on how it works I felt very sorry for parents of disabled kids today. In the program I chat with my Mum to find out what it was like for her way back when I was tiny, but it’s nothing to the hops parents have to jump through now. Typically when it was my turn to join in the atmosphere cheers up to the max, but even though I do like a bit of humour I do hope my key message comes through. I truly believe that we need to work towards an education system that allows everyone to attend the same school, with the chance to study to whatever the child#s ability level is and that allows children to grow up understanding that disability is just part of life. Let’s hope that it happens one day eh?

To hear the show, either tune in to BBC3CR on 95.5FM or 103.8FM or listen via i-Player.

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New Article Round-Up

Here’s a round up of some of my recent articles.

First is a  piece on Wheelchair Dance in Disability Now, as it doesn’t matter whether you live on wheels, legs or both you can cut a rug on the dancefloor.

Then I have an article on sex and disability published on Miss Alice Gray‘s website. It’s the first of a two parter, with the second art being more of a “how-to” guide to sexiness and disability.

I have also joined the writing team at Disability Horizons as an occasional contributor. My first story for them was about dressing up for the party season if you are disabled, called Festive Fashion, but it works for all times of year. You know me, I never need a reason to dress to impress… or shock! The next article for DH is on the recent casting at the BBC for the cream of disabled acting talent which asks Is It Time For Our Close Up? Ages back I wrote my views on Assisted Suicide, so if you missed it maybe check it out.

You can also check out my column in PosAbility magazine at their online portal. It’s not the most recent, but keep checking back as they update it regularly.

So that about it for now. Got loads of new articles coming up, so I’ll keep you all posted.

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BBC3CR Xmas Radio Show 27th December 2013!

Yes, it’s nearly time!

On December 27th I will be presenting and DJing on my Xmas radio show Mik Scarlet’s Festive Funtime on BBC 3 Counties Radio.  From 11am to 1pm I will be playing the best in festive tracks, plus some party faves top get you in the mood for NYE, and chating about memories of Christmas past & present, family Xmas traditions, New Years resolutions and hopes for 2014 amoungst other things. It will be the usual Mik Scarlet waffling and fun but with a festive twist.

I will also be joined by local Luton teenager future Paralympian George Barnard, who will be telling me what it’s like to train to be a top level sporty type and giving me the round up of festive sport. As I know nothing about sport I am relying on George to help me through this sports mad time of year.

Tune in… or it will be available on iPlayer and then on this website. No escape then….

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Busy, Busy, Busy!

At the launch of Disability Sheffield

At the launch of Disability Sheffield

It’s been a crazy couple of months. It started with a trip up to Sheffield to speak and compere at the launch of Disability Sheffield. It’s really great to see so many of these disability led organizations springing up all over the country, giving disabled people a real voice and ensuring we support each other as we fight to achieve equality. Met some great people and hope to go back in 2014.  The Midlands is a hot bed of disability activism for sure.

Telling it like it is at Imperial College

Telling it like it is at Imperial College

Next I gave a speech at Imperial College London as part of their Disability History event. We tend to forget that alongside disabled students, colleges and universities have many disabled staff and this event was to launch the Imperial’s disabled staff forum. Another superb event, run by some really committed people for the benefit of everyone at Imperial. It made Diane’s day as she always wanted to go to Imperial to study Physics. I hope that in the near future I will get the chance to work the Diversity team there, both with the staff and students. One of their big aims for next year is to get more people to identify themselves as disabled and you all know what a fan of disability pride I am… so watch out.

Waiting to see Mr Jones

Waiting to see Mr Jones

Then Diane  and me took some time out for some fun, and went to the 02 Shepherds Bush Empire to see Howard Jones. I was invited by the man himself after we got on so well when I interviewed him for my BBC3CR radio show. I was really looking forward to it, both as we deserved a bit of fun and as it was Howard’s 30th anniversary in the music biz. Synthpop heaven! Sadly the Empire access is pretty poor and before the show got the hits section we had to leave. I won’t bore you with the exact why, but I do wish venues wouldn’t just sit on their laurels and think that temporary access provision that made them legal when the DDA came into effect nearly 20 years ago will suffice forever. I have heard from loads of other disabled gig goers that they also have had problems with the venue. Come on 02, you could make this venue amazing. I am available if you need any advice!

Outside the SIA offices in Milton Keynes

Outside the SIA offices in Milton Keynes

The crazy thing is that only a few days earlier I popped up to Milton Keynes to attend a training session on taking out Equality Act cases. Run by the Spinal Injuries Association and given by disabled lawyer Jonathon Fogerty, it gave everyone who took part the knowledge of how to use the Equality Act to our advantage. I plan to write a fuller blog about what I took away from this day later on, but for now all I can say is The Equality Act – Waste of Space! I am also unsure if you can sue a venue like the 02 Empire as they do have access, it’s just crap.

All smiles at NCCA Xmas drinkies

All smiles at NCCA Xmas drinkies

We were then invited to a Christmas Drinks party at the Langham Hotel on Regents Street for the NCCA as they celebrated the cycle ride across the country by their special Santas, delivering presents to children currently fighting or who recently fighting Neuroblastoma. As this is the type of very rare cancer I had as a baby, and as the charity is also based in Camden, it seemed we were destined to work  together. It was an amazing night, made even more magical when the Santas delivered presents to one survivor and her sister.  It was blissful to see two wonderful little girls (pictured) tearing open the wrapping paper to get at the gifts within, and even more joyful to see their happiness at what they got. And it was only December 2nd! It also made me remember how lucky I am to have beat this cancer, especially as I did it back in the late 1960’s!

Outside the Beeb

Outside the Beeb

Lastly I learned my lines and got myself all ready to attend a special casting even for disabled actors at the BBC. Organised by the Equity Deaf and Disabled Members Committee, the Creative Diversity Network and the broadcasters, it brought together disabled actors and casting directors in an attempt to show how much great disabled acting talent there is out there. It’s a common claim from the broadcasting industry that there isn’t enough disabled talent, and so the DDMC decided to show that was not the case. With the help of Equity staff and the CDN we put this event together so hopefully in the future we will start to see more disabled people in TV dramas. Maybe even me eh? I should also say I am very proud to be the chair of the DDMC at the minute. Another passionate group of disabled people trying to make the world a more equal place.

With Christmas coming up, I doubt things will be letting up either. I do have something else to announce to the world, but that will happen on Monday.

And with that I am off to put my feet up, before it all goes crazy again…..

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